Upcoming Events

Feb
13
Tue
2018
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
Feb 13 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – London 13 February 2018 @ Institute of Directors
Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course. ‘A well structured and presented introduction to the responsibilities, challenges and attributes required of being a[...]
Mar
13
Tue
2018
9:00 am The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ Institute of Directors
The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ Institute of Directors
Mar 13 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
The Effective Non-Executive Director – London 13 March 2018 @ Institute of Directors
The effective Non-Executive Director course helps you to be an effective non-executive director. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge. This one-day interactive course is aimed[...]
Apr
24
Tue
2018
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Orchard Street Business Centre
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Orchard Street Business Centre
Apr 24 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – Bristol 24 April 2018 @ Orchard Street Business Centre
Are you thinking of becoming a Non-Executive Director as part of a Portfolio Career or to develop your boardroom skills prior to taking up an executive director role? Join us on Tuesday, April 24 2018 to[...]
May
22
Tue
2018
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
May 22 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – London 22 May 2018 @ Institute of Directors
Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course. ‘A well structured and presented introduction to the responsibilities, challenges and attributes required of being a[...]
Jun
12
Tue
2018
9:00 am The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ The Plaza
The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ The Plaza
Jun 12 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
The Effective Non-Executive Director – Liverpool 12 June 2018 @ The Plaza
The effective Non-Executive Director course helps you to be an effective non-executive director. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge. This one-day interactive course is aimed[...]

Job for disqualified former CEO at NT Government-owned corporation

A disqualified former CEO of two separate Aboriginal corporations has been appointed to a project management role with the Northern Territory Government’s “strategic land developer”, the Land Development Corporation.

[…]

Five questions about the VW scandal

Bernd Osterloh, head of Volkwagen's works council, addresses a news conference at the company's headquarters in Wolfburg, Germany October 6, 2015. Osterloh said on Tuesday the diesel emissions scandal that has hammered the company's stock and reputation, would impact earnings at the core autos division as well as bonus payments to workers.

Now that that the initial revelations regarding the VW scandal have sunk in it’s time to begin assessing the larger significance of those revelations. While the case and, we predict, VW, will continue for years (we are only at the end of the beginning, and far from the beginning of the end), we are far enough along to see five large questions emerging. These questions will tell us much about the economic, corporate and cultural future of VW and German enterprise.

1) VW was an integral component of Germany’s industrial reputation in Europe, across the Atlantic in the United States, and around the world. Now, that hard-won reputation is at risk. How broad will the damage be to German businesses’ reputation not just for quality, but for “premium quality?”

2) Turning from the German business sector to the German economy as a whole, the VW scandal has many ironies, not least of which is that the company was a key driver (so to speak) of the famous German Wirthschaftswunder. Economic health propelled a vanquished Germany to the forefront of Europe’s post-WWII recovery and then made post-Cold War reunification a success. Does the VW scandal have the potential to slow down the overall growth of the German economy, and what are the European and global implications of that at a time when the Chinese economy is also sputtering?

3) From a corporate governance perspective, the scandal represents some of the most boneheaded thinking ever. Following disclosure of the fraud, €14bn (£10bn; $15.6bn) was wiped off VW’s stock market value. Whoever knew/orchestrated the scheme thought they would get away with it, but did they really not foresee the consequences or even the likelihood of getting caught? We will long be studying the abnormal “fraud psychology” of this case.

4) Germany ranks among the top ten countries for low corruption according to Transparency International. Yet VW is not alone among German companies in making major headlines with massive ethics failures in recent years, joining Siemens, Bayer, Deutsche Bank, and many others. What does this mean for the future of Germany’s role as a force for anti-corruption at home and internationally?

5) Former VW CEO Winterkorn resigned but claimed he knew nothing about the scandal. What does this say about the structure and management culture of Germany’s largest companies? How widespread is “plausible deniability” in German business culture–and in all business culture everywhere? If so, what are the dangers of this going forward, and what should be done to address them?

Authors

  • Norman Eisen
  • Peter Goldmann

Image Source: © Hannibal Hanschke / Reuters […]

PNG’s Prime Minister slams Fairfax allegations on UBS loan

Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Peter O’Neill has broken his silence on allegations highlighted by former leaders Sir Michael Somare and Sir Mekere Morauta. […]