Upcoming Events

Apr
30
Tue
2019
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ The Waterfront
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ The Waterfront
Apr 30 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Are you thinking of becoming a Non-Executive Director as part of a Portfolio Career or to develop your boardroom skills prior to taking up an executive director role? <img data-attachment-id='211' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/how-to-become-a-non-executive-director-bristol-21-january-2013/boardroomlr/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/boardroomlr-e1403708151819.png?fit=600%2C486&ssl=1' data-orig-size='600,486' data-comments-opened='0' data-image-meta='{'aperture':'0','credit':'','camera':'','caption':'','created_timestamp':'0','copyright':'','focal_length':'0','iso':'0','shutter_speed':'0','title':''}'[...]
May
23
Thu
2019
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
May 23 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – London 23 May 2019 @ Institute of Directors
Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course. <img data-attachment-id='113603' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/10-things-non-executive-directors-can-do-to-satisfy-their-legal-responsibilities/ned3-2/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=1500%2C883&ssl=1' data-orig-size='1500,883' data-comments-opened='0' data-image-meta='{'aperture':'0','credit':'','camera':'','caption':'','created_timestamp':'0','copyright':'','focal_length':'0','iso':'0','shutter_speed':'0','title':'','orientation':'0'}' data-image-title='NED3' data-image-description=' ‘ data-medium-file=’https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=300%2C177&ssl=1′ data-large-file=’https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=695%2C409&ssl=1′ class=’alignright size-medium wp-image-113603′ src=’https://i0.wp.com/www.nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31-300×177.png?resize=300%2C177&ssl=1′[...]
Jun
11
Tue
2019
9:00 am The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ The Plaza
The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ The Plaza
Jun 11 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
The effective Non-Executive Director course helps you to be an effective non-executive director. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge. <img data-attachment-id='113603' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/10-things-non-executive-directors-can-do-to-satisfy-their-legal-responsibilities/ned3-2/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=1500%2C883&ssl=1' data-orig-size='1500,883' data-comments-opened='0'[...]
Jun
25
Tue
2019
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Cornwall Buildings
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Cornwall Buildings
Jun 25 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – Birmingham 25 June 2019 @ Cornwall Buildings
Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course.   <img data-attachment-id='2823' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/become-non-executive-director-manchester-24-september-2014/ned1/' data-orig-file='https://i2.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709592905.png?fit=600%2C300&ssl=1' data-orig-size='600,300' data-comments-opened='0' data-image-meta='{'aperture':'0','credit':'','camera':'','caption':'','created_timestamp':'0','copyright':'','focal_length':'0','iso':'0','shutter_speed':'0','title':''}' data-image-title='NED1' data-image-description=' ‘ data-medium-file=’https://i2.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709592905.png?fit=300%2C149&ssl=1′ data-large-file=’https://i2.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709592905.png?fit=695%2C347&ssl=1′ class=’alignright size-medium wp-image-2823′[...]
Jul
16
Tue
2019
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ 111 Piccadilly
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ 111 Piccadilly
Jul 16 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – Manchester 16 July 2019 @ 111 Piccadilly
Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course. <img data-attachment-id='2823' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/become-non-executive-director-manchester-24-september-2014/ned1/' data-orig-file='https://i2.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709592905.png?fit=600%2C300&ssl=1' data-orig-size='600,300' data-comments-opened='0' data-image-meta='{'aperture':'0','credit':'','camera':'','caption':'','created_timestamp':'0','copyright':'','focal_length':'0','iso':'0','shutter_speed':'0','title':''}' data-image-title='NED1' data-image-description=' ‘ data-medium-file=’https://i2.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709592905.png?fit=300%2C149&ssl=1′ data-large-file=’https://i2.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709592905.png?fit=695%2C347&ssl=1′ class=’alignright size-medium wp-image-2823′ src=’https://i0.wp.com/www.nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NED1-e1403709558124-300×149.png?resize=300%2C149&ssl=1′[...]

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust – Non-Executive Director

Non-Executive Director – Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust is seeking a new Non-Executive Director to join the Board with experience at senior/board level and the right qualities to help take the Trust forward and promote the interests of the trust’s service users. At Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust we provide a wide range […]

The post Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust – Non-Executive Director appeared first on NEDworks.

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Press release: Disqualified boss gets second ban for illegally running restaurant

Previously disqualified director has been banned for a second time after illegally running a Yeovil restaurant using former colleague as a stooge boss. […]

Press release: Companies involved in fraudulent art investment scheme wound-up

Two companies involved in what appears to be a fraudulent art investment scheme have been shut down after abusing close to £1.4 million of investors’ money. […]

Guidance: Redundancy payments: RP14 and RP14A upload instructions

Details on RP14 and RP14A upload […]

Government to push ahead with new audit and governance watchdog

FRC, audit

The UK is set to get a new audit and financial reporting regulator.

The government has announced that the current watchdog, the Financial Reporting Council (FRC), will be replaced with a new organisation named the Audit, Reporting and Governance Authority (ARGA).

Announcing the measure, business secretary Greg Clark said: “This new body will build on our status as a great place to do business and will form an important part of strengthened public trust in businesses and the regulations that govern them.”

The new watchdog will have brand new powers, including a mandate to make direct changes to accounts, rather than go to the courts.

Clark’s decision comes after a report by Sir John Kingman last year, which advised that the FRC should be shut down.

The Kingman Review concluded: “What this spotlight has revealed is an institution constructed in a different era—a rather ramshackle house, cobbled together with all sorts of extensions over time.

“The house is—is just—serviceable, up to a point, but it leaks and creaks, sometimes badly. The inhabitants of the house have sought to patch and mend. But in the end, the house is built on weak foundations.”

The Kingman Review was commissioned by Clark in April last year following heavy criticism of the FRC and its work in relation to monitoring the work of KPMG—auditors of Carillion, the construction giant that collapsed at the end of last year—and Carillion’s financial reporting.

Kingman’s recommendations include that chairs and chief executives of the new body should be subject to pre-approval by MPs on the business select committee of the House of Commons, and the new regulator should not be funded with voluntary donations but through a statutory levy instead.

Kingman also advised that the new regulator should be allowed to remove an auditor or force re-tendering. He also wanted the watchdog to be able to recommend to shareholders “that they consider a change of CEO, CFO, chair or audit committee chair”.

He also recommended that the new regulator might question company strategy. It said: “The review recommends that the new regulator should be able to commission a skilled person review, paid for by the company, in circumstance where there is any significant interest arising from its strategic objective…”

Responding to the government’s announcement, Sir John Kingman said: “As I set out in my review, we need a new audit regulator with a clear and precise sense of purpose and I am pleased that the government shares that vision.”

The FRC’s current chair, Sir Win Bischoff, said in a statement that a “speedy” implementation of the Kingman recommendations would “increase public confidence in audit in the UK”.

A new regulator is not the only change ahead for the audit industry in the UK. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has been running a consultation on the UK’s audit market.

Among its recommendations were to introduce regulation of audit committees to persuade them to focus more on audit quality. The regulations proposed include audit committees reporting directly to the regulator. It also proposed a power for the regulator to issue “public reprimands” for audit committees that have failed to “follow proper procedure”.

The CMA also recommended joint audits and a some form of split between audit and non-audit services inside the same firm.

The CMA audit consultation closed at the end of January. The consultation on the new audit regulator runs until 11 June.

The post Government to push ahead with new audit and governance watchdog appeared first on Board Agenda.

[…]

The Royal College of Surgeons of England – Lay Members

Lay Members – The Royal College of Surgeons of England There are vacancies for Lay Members at The Royal College of Surgeons of England. This is an exceptional opportunity to share your talents and expertise to make a positive difference to the lives of people in your community. About Us We are a membership organisation […]

The post The Royal College of Surgeons of England – Lay Members appeared first on NEDworks.

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Board Members – Poverty and Inequality Commission

Board Members – Poverty and Inequality Commission Reference: 1620 Remuneration: £225 per day Location: Edinburgh and Glasgow Closing date: 01 April 2019 at midnight Scottish Ministers are looking to appoint up to eight Members to the new statutory Poverty and Inequality Commission. The appointments are for up to five years following establishment of the body […]

The post Board Members – Poverty and Inequality Commission appeared first on NEDworks.

[…]

Why boards need to support whistleblowers

whistleblowing, social media

Misselling financial products to meet bonus targets. Unsafe working practices on construction sites. Breach of food safety regulations putting consumers at risk of illness. Sexual favours for disaster relief aid. Abuse of residents in care homes. These are a few examples of the thousands of potential harms that workers have raised with the whistleblowing charity Protect, which has “Speak-Up, Stop Harm” as its motto.

Many of the cases have not only put innocent third parties at risk, but have also damaged organisations as a result of regulatory sanctions, adverse media coverage, scrutiny by politicians and adverse consumer reactions. And in many of these cases, those at board level in the organisations had no idea that those poor practices were happening until they had reached a level of severity which meant that damage to the organisation was inevitable.

Reputational damage

Once poor practices have damaged an organisation, it makes it more likely that there will be damage to the reputations of individuals with leadership responsibilities. Of course, the greatest risk rests with executives (and the introduction by regulators of increased personal accountability, such as the senior managers’ regime in financial services, has increased that risk) but there is also risk to non-executive directors, particularly board and board committee chairs. Questions are likely to be asked—sometimes in uncomfortable public forums—about the effectiveness of oversight by non-executives.

Poor practices are much more likely to be identified at an early stage if 100% of workers (including contractors) can use effective and well-understood arrangements to raise concerns in a safe manner

Given this context it is in everyone’s interests (the public, the organisation, its workforce and its directors) that potential harms are identified at the earliest possible moment so that, if genuine, they can be nipped in the bud by management in private thus avoiding the risks of additional damage that can result from external interventions.

It is sometimes said that internal audit and compliance functions can be “the eyes and ears of the board”, but even if those functions are well resourced, they might only amount to around 2% of staff. Inevitably they will not be able to pick up all poor practices, notwithstanding their aspirations to provide “assurance”. Poor practices are much more likely to be identified at an early stage if 100% of workers (including contractors) are “the eyes and ears of the board” and can use effective and well-understood arrangements to raise concerns in a safe manner.

whistleblowing, graphic

Speak up

The importance of effective speak-up arrangements has been recognised for some time, but has been strengthened by the 2018 Governance Code published by the Financial Reporting Council. The 2016 version of the code contained a provision in the accountability section under which “the audit committee should review arrangements by which staff of the company may, in confidence, raise concerns about possible improprieties in matters of financial reporting or other matters.” (my emphases).

The 2018 version of the code contains the following principle in the board leadership and company purpose section: “The board should ensure that workforce policies and practices are consistent with the company’s values and support its long-term sustainable success. The workforce should be able to raise any matters of concern.” (my emphases).

This new principle is supported by a provision which sets out an expectation that the board should routinely review the means for the workforce to raise concerns and the reports from its operation.

One source of help for boards and workers is Protect. Established 25 years ago as “Public Concern at Work”, it seeks to make whistleblowing work better for both employers and workers. We provide advice and training to organisations as to how to make their arrangements for workers to raise concerns more effective. Our clients include major banks, media organisations, charities, health and care providers and professional bodies. We have recently developed a benchmarking tool to help organisations assess the effectiveness of their arrangements and to compare their practices with others.

Even in well-meaning organisations, the odds are stacked against individuals who are considering raising concerns about potential harms and many choose to stay silent

We also provide free, confidential and legally privileged advice to workers who face a whistleblowing dilemma. Our advice line is much more than a reporting postbox; we take time to understand the situation that an individual is facing, and give them practical advice on how to raise their concerns safely. We deal with around 2,500 cases each year and in the course of our 25-year history have handled around 40,000 cases.

Even in well-meaning organisations, the odds are stacked against individuals who are considering raising concerns about potential harms and many choose to stay silent—until after the issues have gone public. Given the organisational and personal risks it is important for directors to listen for a whistle.

Paul Boyle is chair of the whistleblowing charity Protect.

The post Why boards need to support whistleblowers appeared first on Board Agenda.

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The Point of Care Foundation – Chair

Chair – The Point of Care Foundation Recruiter: The Point of Care Foundation Location: London Salary: Unpaid voluntary position Posted: 03 Mar 2019 Closes: 29 Mar 2019 Sectors: Travel & Tourism Contract Type: Permanent Hours: Part Time Are you seeking a senior governance role in an influential not-for-profit organisation? Do you have experience of governance, […]

The post The Point of Care Foundation – Chair appeared first on NEDworks.

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YHA (England and Wales) – Trustee

Trustee – YHA (England and Wales) Organisation: YHA (England and Wales) Reference: Trustee2019 Vacancy Type: Trustee Deadline: 1st April 2019 Region: Nation Wide Vacancy Details We are YHA. We transform young lives forever through travel and real adventure At almost 90 years old, YHA is a charity with a proud history of enabling people from […]

The post YHA (England and Wales) – Trustee appeared first on NEDworks.

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