Upcoming Events

Sep
10
Tue
2019
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ The Waterfront
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ The Waterfront
Sep 10 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Are you thinking of becoming a Non-Executive Director as part of a Portfolio Career or to develop your boardroom skills prior to taking up an executive director role? <img data-attachment-id='211' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/how-to-become-a-non-executive-director-bristol-21-january-2013/boardroomlr/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/boardroomlr-e1403708151819.png?fit=600%2C486&ssl=1' data-orig-size='600,486' data-comments-opened='0' data-image-meta='{'aperture':'0','credit':'','camera':'','caption':'','created_timestamp':'0','copyright':'','focal_length':'0','iso':'0','shutter_speed':'0','title':''}'[...]
Oct
8
Tue
2019
9:00 am The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ Institute of Directors
The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ Institute of Directors
Oct 8 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
The effective Non-Executive Director course helps you to be an effective non-executive director. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge. <img data-attachment-id='113603' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/10-things-non-executive-directors-can-do-to-satisfy-their-legal-responsibilities/ned3-2/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=1500%2C883&ssl=1' data-orig-size='1500,883' data-comments-opened='0'[...]
Oct
22
Tue
2019
9:00 am How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
How to become a Non-Executive Di... @ Institute of Directors
Oct 22 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
How to become a Non-Executive Director – London 22 October 2019 @ Institute of Directors
Find out how you can obtain a Non-Executive Director position by booking a place on this interactive 1-day course. <img data-attachment-id='113603' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/10-things-non-executive-directors-can-do-to-satisfy-their-legal-responsibilities/ned3-2/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=1500%2C883&ssl=1' data-orig-size='1500,883' data-comments-opened='0' data-image-meta='{'aperture':'0','credit':'','camera':'','caption':'','created_timestamp':'0','copyright':'','focal_length':'0','iso':'0','shutter_speed':'0','title':'','orientation':'0'}' data-image-title='NED3' data-image-description=' ‘ data-medium-file=’https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=300%2C177&ssl=1′ data-large-file=’https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=695%2C409&ssl=1′ class=’alignright size-medium wp-image-113603′ src=’https://i0.wp.com/www.nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31-300×177.png?resize=300%2C177&ssl=1′[...]
Nov
6
Wed
2019
9:00 am The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ Institute of Directors
The Effective Non-Executive Dire... @ Institute of Directors
Nov 6 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
The effective Non-Executive Director course helps you to be an effective non-executive director. It instils a real sense of what is expected of NEDs, and how you can meet the challenge. <img data-attachment-id='113603' data-permalink='https://nedworks.net/10-things-non-executive-directors-can-do-to-satisfy-their-legal-responsibilities/ned3-2/' data-orig-file='https://i1.wp.com/nedworks.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/NED31.png?fit=1500%2C883&ssl=1' data-orig-size='1500,883' data-comments-opened='0'[...]

CEOx1Day: Giving future leaders a taste of the top job

By Kester Scrope

Kester Scrope, Isabelle Mettan-Ure, CEOx1Day, Odgers Berndtson

‘I hope she got a sense of the breadth of a leader’s role’

Kester Scrope, CEO of Odgers Berndtson, on his day with Isabelle Mettan-Ure.

At Odgers Berndtson we are very privileged to have extraordinary relationships with business leaders across the world. We had this firmly in mind when we launched the CEOx1Day initiative around a decade ago. Put simply, this is a way for us to use our networks in a very personal way to help young people about to leave full time education and go to work.

We have 61 offices across the world and have run the programme internationally for many years—a genuinely global initiative. We are hugely grateful to hundreds of the world’s top business leaders for getting involved. In the UK this year the participating leaders were from a diverse range of businesses, including the CEOs of Visa, Sainsbury’s, ITV, Domino’s Pizza Group, Barnardo’s and The Royal Mint.

For me, I suspect like other participating CEOs, taking part in CEOx1Day is a refreshing opportunity to see our businesses and roles through new eyes from a different perspective.

From the moment Isabelle arrived I was struck by the honesty, enthusiasm, curiosity and openness that a day like this can bring. Also, her confidence. Isabelle was very ready to participate and offer her views—in no sense was she cowed by the new environment she found herself in.

Taking part in CEOx1Day is a refreshing opportunity to see our businesses and roles through new eyes from a different perspective

Our day was not scripted, if anything it was too full, allowing less time to brief and debrief than I would have liked.

Our first meeting was with Jeremy Gilley, the founder of Peace One Day, which is an extraordinary charity that strives for a world without violence. He had generously offered his time to talk to our people in London about both his charitable work and contribute to our inclusion festival that was running (where we celebrate the diversity within our people here). Isabelle’s engagement with the subject and what he was saying was a clear reminder of the importance all leaders have to engage with a sense of mission and purpose beyond the purely commercial if we are to motivate and engage people to do great things.

Our ethos here is recognising that our work makes a difference, directly impacting on the lives of people and the health of our client’s organisations. This sense of mission is clearly something that Isabelle could relate to.

CEOx1Day has a strong sense of purpose. In the UK and globally we enjoy a leading position in the education sector, working with a wide range of universities—from the Russell Group and beyond. Our students reflect this diversity too, in terms of academic institution, background, sex, ethnicity etc.

I hope she saw the importance of the individual and people in an organisation—that businesses are made up of individuals, and that there is a human scale however large or broad the business

My student for the day, Isabelle, is studying at Lincoln University, (coincidentally the university’s vice chancellor, Professor Mary Stuart, is one of the participating CEOs).

I’d like to think Isabelle was struck by the variety of tasks in a leadership role but that a unifying purpose means that all activities make a collective sense. In our case activity ranged from a management meeting with the MD of our Asia-Pacific business to staff meetings, meetings with business heads and even the agony of a photo shoot on the roof.

If nothing else, I hope she went away with a sense of the challenges, variety and breadth of a leader’s role. I also hope she saw the importance of the individual and people in an organisation—that businesses are made up of individuals, and that there is a human scale however large or broad the business.

I would like thank Isabelle for helping me look at my job in a different way for the day and realise how lucky I am to do what I do with the people I do it with.

‘Everything comes back to how you communicate with others’

Isabelle Mettan-Ure, product design student at the University of Lincoln, on her day with Kester Scrope, CEO of Odgers Berndtson.

Leadership takes more than just the will to succeed, it’s takes an individual who has the understanding and trust of the people around them to guide the way.

If only I could get there! The tubes go down, panic, fire alert at Morden and the Northern Line suspended; it seemed not even the extra hour of time I allocated could save me. I may not be able to rely on the underground network but there was no doubt that I was a good source of quality entertainment for the early morning commuters, a spectacular sight of The Apprentice meets sweaty London Marathon day.

A quick breather and brush down in the lift and I was ready to go, greeted warmly by an expectant Kester Scope, CEO of Odgers Berndtson. Straight in and the day began with a briefing of the exciting, chock-a-block schedule that lay ahead of us. It was this point that the enormity of what I was experiencing sank in: such a privilege to be in this beautiful office adjacent to Saint Paul’s, let alone at the side of Kester. It really was an opportunity which I never expected to gain when submitting my application six months prior.

It was a brilliant opportunity to see Kester in action, as well as understand how Odgers Berndtson operates in a vast range of different faculties and on such a detailed level

The first of the morning meetings set the tone for the rest of what was an incredible day: breakfast with Jeremy Gilley, founder and creator of Peace One Day, which is a fixed calendar date of “global ceasefire and non-violence”. From the outset, Kester drove direction but with consideration, praise and interest in both Jeremy as an individual and what he had accomplished. Even I was given the time to contribute, to speak passionately about my own core values and my vision for a future of shared experiences, harmony and sustainability.

It is largely Kester’s strong respect for others that will stay with me. One of the reasons I applied for the CEOx1day opportunity in the first place was the hope to see this very trait in action. And, with such personal views on the importance of showcasing ideas within a leadership role I was certainly not disappointed. Without collaboration, without views that evolve with time, we cannot help innovate the traditional workplace or create an atmosphere where everyone feels they have a role to play.

After Jeremy completed his presentation to a wider audience of Odgers employees, we dived straight into a collective of back-to-back meetings including those with all the practice leaders and Asia-Pacific management teams. For me, it was a brilliant opportunity to see Kester in action, as well as understand how Odgers Berndtson operates in a vast range of different faculties and on such a detailed level.

Despite the busy schedule, Kester still made time and effort to connect with his colleagues both personally and professionally. This surprised me from someone of his position and taught me that everything comes back to how you communicate with others.

It seems CEOs don’t even have time for lunch, Kester poring over his emails as we both tuck into a tasty sandwich; it was a masterclass of multitasking, his dedication on full display. My appetite for asking questions didn’t seem to disrupt the flow either—I was amazed but also incredibly grateful that he took the time to answer, reflect and then even respond with an interest in my own career ambitions.

Despite the busy schedule, Kester still made time and effort to connect with his colleagues both personally and professionally

Some rather exciting PR shots later and after another detailed meeting, I got to oversee the work of one very remarkable lady: Baroness Virginia Bottomley, chair of the Odgers Berndtson board and CEO practice. Conducting searches for some of highest positions in public and private organisations, Virginia demonstrates how companies would simply fall apart it wasn’t for the dedication of individuals on every single level. Businesses are a complex puzzle of people and both Virginia and Kester are those critical corner pieces. It is their wealth of experience that forms the foundation to build upon. In short, leadership is exactly that; linkage, communication and direction.

Before I knew it this amazing day had drawn to a close and I couldn’t quite believe the pace at which it had flown by. I had learnt so much and yet there were still so many aspects of the CEO role left to explore.

My personal ambition is to lead the way in making memorable moments the key feature in our everyday lives as well as bring innovation into a workplace. In all, my CEOx1day has taught me that this is really is possible if you are able to lead with passion and responsibility.

Thank you to Kester Scrope and Odgers Berndtson for making this happen. It really was a remarkable insight and one that I would totally recommend. I hope this is the first of many fantastic experiences to come for myself and many others.

For more information about the scheme visit www.odgersberndtson.com/en-gb/ceox1day

The post CEOx1Day: Giving future leaders a taste of the top job appeared first on Board Agenda.

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Press release: Former solicitor’s restrictions extended for abusing client funds

By HM Government Former solicitor has bankruptcy restrictions extended for nine years after he made loans to clients using money that was held in trust by the firm.

From:: Press release: Former solicitor’s restrictions extended for abusing client funds

The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust – Non-Executive Director

By Debbie Wright

Non-Executive Director – The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust The Dudley Group is looking for a talented and ambitious Non-executive Director. The position requires an outstanding individual who can work as part of a unitary board to hold the Board to account for the setting and delivery of its stated ambition within the applicable national […]

The post The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust – Non-Executive Director appeared first on NEDworks.

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Open consultation: Call for evidence: regulation of insolvency practitioners review of current regulatory landscape

By HM Government The Insolvency Service has published a call for evidence on the current regulatory framework for insolvency practitioners.

From:: Open consultation: Call for evidence: regulation of insolvency practitioners review of current regulatory landscape

News story: Call for evidence on insolvency practitioner regulation

By HM Government Stakeholders are being asked to give views on the current regulatory framework for insolvency practitioners in the UK following changes introduced in 2015.

From:: News story: Call for evidence on insolvency practitioner regulation

English Heritage – Trustee

By Debbie Wright

Trustee – English Heritage Recruiter: English Heritage Location: London (Greater) (GB) Salary: Unremunerated, but all reasonable travel expenses reimbursed Posted: 10 Jul 2019 Closes: 2 Sept 2019 Ref: 12290 Position/Level: Senior Management Responsibilities: Executive Management Sector: Not for Profit / Charity Contract Type: Voluntary / Trustee Trustee Unremunerated, but all reasonable travel expenses reimbursed / […]

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Locala Community Partnerships CIC – 2 Non-Executive Directors

By Debbie Wright

2 Non-Executive Directors – Locala Community Partnerships CIC Locala Community Partnerships CIC (Locala) is a successful, innovative and forward thinking Social Enterprise which provides community healthcare for the people of Kirklees as well as a number of services in neighbouring Calderdale and Bradford too. Locala Community Partnerships CIC (Locala) is a successful, innovative and forward […]

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Press release: Counterfeit watch dealer hit with bankruptcy restrictions

By HM Government A convicted counterfeit watch dealer from Brighton has had his bankruptcy restrictions extended for eight years.

From:: Press release: Counterfeit watch dealer hit with bankruptcy restrictions

New threats to ‘diversity of thought’ despite better board composition

By Gavin Hinks

“We see some extremely good results. But there are also implications.” So says Dr Elisabeth Marx, a corporate leadership expert, after undertaking a close study of UK board composition two decades after a previous investigation lifted the lid on what was happening inside boardrooms.

The conclusion is that things are definitely better, but unintended consequences have emerged: there are concerns about where future female executives will come from and whether non-executives spend enough time with executive functions other than the CEO and CFO. There is also a worry that diversity of thought may become a casualty of the increasing dominance of accountancy or finance as a professional background. Yes, there has been progression. But at the cost of new problems.

The first View at the Top study by Marx was undertaken in 1996 and provided a snapshot of boardrooms in Britain’s top 100 companies. A fresh study—undertaken in conjunction with the Leadership Institute at London Business School and delivered at the annual London conference of ICSA: The Governance Institute—reveals how board composition has changed, based on 2017 data.

Back then boards averaged 12 members; now they average 11. Non-executive membership has grown from 51% to 74%. Women accounted for 4.1% of board members in 1996, but are now at 28%. Average boardroom age has matured from 56 to 58.5. Meanwhile, accountants and finance specialists totted up to 38% in the first study but have come to account for almost half (49%) of all boardroom seats now. White occupants hold 96% of CEO positions and 98% of chairships.

Execs vs non-execs

The upshot is that while increased non-executive presence on boards has improved governance, and growing female boardroom membership is evidence of greater equality, there are still concerns.

Most women on boards are non-executives and Marx believes that achievement has come at the expense of hollowing out the ranks of female executives. That possibly implies a lull while a new wave of women rise to the most senior executive levels.

Marx says: “The interesting thing is that the increase in women is [among] the non-executives. That’s been extremely successful as a way of increasing women on boards.” But she adds: “This reduces the internal talent pipeline of executive women because they moved to concentrate on portfolio careers.”

According to Marx, the changing boardroom balance between non-executives and executives raises problems too—non-executives are mainly exposed to just CEOs and CFOs, and few of the other functional executives. Here two questions arise: how do non-executives acquire a reliable view of operational risk, and how do they get a taste of the talent available for succession planning?

“The question is, how will the non-executives know the potential CEO contenders?” says Marx. She adds: “If you do not know the executive team who are running the company day-to-day, how are [the board] equipped to predict the likelihood of achieving the strategy?”

Diverse perspectives

The dominance of accounting and finance as a baseline profession before settling into a boardroom role also prompts concern. According to Marx: “This reduces the diversity of perspectives… which is urgently needed given the complexity of business.”

The View at the Top report comes with a list of questions for boards to consider, not least whether having fewer executives on board undermines a board’s “in-depth knowledge of operational details” and whether non-executives fully understand the “bench strength” of their executive team. Also worth considering is whether the dominance of accountancy, or finance, as a background offers boards the full range of “diverse” views to function in the current business environment.

Randall Peterson, co-author of the report and academic director of London Business School’s Leadership Institute, describes some of the findings as “alarming” despite genuine progress being made. Peter Swabey, research director at ICSA, says: “One way that boards are judged is whether they represent the population they serve. We have come a long way since 1996, but there is still a distance to go.”

The report clearly signals there is no room for complacency. ICSA’s press release concludes boards are set to remain “pale, male and stale”. At a time when there is greater pressure than ever on non-executive and executive members, the report provides a blunt reminder that there is work to do on making sure board composition is right.

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Hampton-Alexander CEO warns of ‘challenge to shift attitudes’ on gender diversity

By Gavin Hinks

While the UK approach to boardroom gender diversity is “arguably” one of the most sophisticated in the world, there is still work to be done, according to the chief executive of the Hampton-Alexander Review, the body that campaigns for improved representation of women at the UK’s top companies.

Denise Wilson was speaking to delegates at the annual conference of ICSA: The Governance Institute in London when she made her observations.

Gender diversity in both the FTSE 100 and FTSE 350 has improved significantly over recent years. Since 2011 the proportion of women on FTSE 100 boards has grown from 12% to almost 29%, while the figures for the FTSE 350 show growth from 9% to 28%.

However, Wilson said there remained concerns about the 50 companies in the FTSE 350 without a single female representative on their executive committees, and the lack of female chairs.

Wilson said the use of targets—33% for female representation on boards— had been “key” to voluntary improvements compared with legislative approaches in other countries.

But she added:“It’s clear that many companies have been working hard for several years…others have been slow, or working slowly, while a few are going nowhere.”

She added that of the 880 women on FTSE 350 boards, only 27 had reached the role of chair. “The question is why… have so few been appointed to have the top job.”

Wilson said there was also a challenge to shift attitudes at companies that have appointed a single female board director and believe they are finished—so called “one and done” boards.

She said: “These days tokenistic approaches are little better than all-male boards.”

She did however praise a number of companies—BHP Billiton, Vodafone, O2, Aviva, Diageo, Unilever and Lloyds Bank—for their work to encourage women to reach senior levels.

However, Wilson remained emphatic that there were still issues to address.

“There is much more work to do challenging unhelpful myths and banishing unconscious bias,” she warned.

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